Friday, January 21, 2011

Wire Instruments and Pet Stains




This article discusses an upcoming artist named Al Taylor. Al Taylor, doesn't just do ordinary 2-D and 3-D projects, he is taking his creativity and art work to the next level. His new collection does include some fragile ink, pencil and gouache drawings, and a few wire and wood sculptures, but also includes something interesting that caught my eye. Al Taylor is using ink, toner, and paint to make drop like puddles on paper. He is even turning, dogs' urine puddles on urban sidewalks into art. This new approach to art is humorous, yet so simple. I think many people will love it, because the bottom line is, Al Taylor is creatively genius. If this new simple art sells, what will happen to many of the art supply stores? If Taylor is using a lot of photographs, then there won't be such a demand for canvas, or all the varieties of pencils and paint brushes. If people start to only focus on the concept of making every day subjects into art, then the art supply industry might suffer considering what medium they chose to use. Al Taylor seems to be using recycled products, the article didn't exactly say, but I'm assuming that the toner, and wire weren't bought for these projects if his style is to put focus on dog urine. If recycled art also becomes a big deal and art joins the "green" band wagon then art supply stores will most definitely start to suffer then. Going green has become such a trend, that I can easily see it taking over part of the art world.

7 comments:

sarah said...

Going green has definately become very popular very fast and it has taken over many companies and businesses. But there is a difference between using recycled art like used canvases or broken sculptures, and animal waste or human waste. In my opinion, I don't think people will be interested in seeing dog waste or smelling it (if it's on a canvas) if they are at an art exhibit. But maybe some people will get satisfaction out of it, maybe trying to figure out why that artist chose to put something we see everyday into a piece of influential art. On the other hand, I do like how Al Taylor found a new creative way to be more art efficient.

Alissa said...

Very interesting article Lindsay. I too agree that this new way of creating art is very innovative. My only concern is what happens when more and more artists decide to use the method of using dog waste instead of the more conventional methods. Do paintbrush and watercolor retailers go out of business? Dogs aren't obviously making a profit from him using their waste so it is a very cost efficient method for him. Very cool illustration and article.

Cara Sheffer said...

This is very cool. This guy has a unique and creative mind. I think this might catch in the art world. If it does, what do you think it will do to all of the other artists out there? Do you think this kind of stuff will take over museums or even create new ones? This will be interesting to see where it takes the art world to next.

Lindsay said...

@ Sarah
Well, the only way first of all to use recycled canvas would be to paint over an old piece of art, which is unlikely. Recycled art is mainly using trash, or waste that you wouldn't normally be used for art. It's making everyday objects into art, that is what makes the recycled art well, art.
I can see how many people could be offended or how they wouldn't be interested in seeing dog waste.It's not just seeing dog waste though, it's seeing how a person could make that aesthetically appealing. How someone could make that into art. By forcing you to see something as repulsive as dog waste and making you see it in a new way is what I consider art. Personally, I think it will be attractive to many people, simply because it is a new idea.

Lindsay said...

@ Alison
Your point about water color and paint brush businesses going out of business crossed my mind too. I thought about it, and I came to the conclusion that people will still need them, but they just might not be in such a demand. There will always be a classic art world and the new cutting edge art world. For example, almost every artist is trained in a classic environment, and some stay like that, and others move to more innovative, and different ways. So I think people will always buy water colors and paint brushes, the demand just might go down.

@ Cara
Yeah! I definitely think this will open some new doors! More than likely, there will be some new exhibits featuring this kind of work to show off the ideas. I don't think it will completley take over museums, just because there are so many classic pieces that people still want to see that need to be show cased, but I definitely think there will be some temporary exhibits showing this work.

Ethan said...

I honestly can't see this catching on with too many artists or even collectors. I'm not going to say that I'm the most educated on what is considered art right now, but I don't think people are just going to give up their old ways to "go green" by painting or sculpting with recycled materials. Also I'm not too sure I'd want to have somebody's waste hanging on my wall, mostly for sanitary reasons. I do agree that more and more green art is appearing, but I don't agree that art supply stores will begin to lose money, because it just isn't a big enough fad (not to be condescending).

Elizabeth said...

As is said above, I think the sanitary reasons and just general aesthetic value of the art will prevent it from becoming a trend. Although the art is clearly much more inexpensive for the artist, and if the demand for it is high enough, the profit he will make will be higher. As for this catching on with other artists, I don't see this becoming a widespread thing. The point of his art is that it's unique, and he's the only one using these..mediums. If many other artists began using this technique, Taylor's art wouldn't be as original and the artists after him would not be seen as uniquely creative.