Monday, March 21, 2011

Americans Cancel Trips to Japan Due to the Earthquake

Due to the earthquake and the following tsunami in Japan, Americans are advised by the US government to postpone or cancel their planned trips to Japan for either leisure or business visits. Japanese travel organizations have described themselves as "swamped" with phone calls after this disaster.

Peggy Goodman informs us, "trips will resume before the end of May or beginning of June." Goodman is the president of Friendly Planet Travel in Pennsylvania who has yearly plans of tours going on in Japan. 727,000 visitors in Japan came from America last year, according to the tourism organization.

After the disaster occurred, the State Department sent warnings to the Americans to keep people from traveling to Japan since there was a shortage of water and food beginning to happen. Although the alerts end April 1, there are still many risk factors that may keep people from traveling. Many businesses are not operating in Japan right now because they're in recovery. Japan has many resources that we need every day and affects many major corporations we have. Japan has greatly impacted the entire world more than with just the economy. Japan moved 8 feet with this earthquake, it also moved the Earth 4 inches on it's axis. Although it may not seem like much, it has had a big affect. One life was lost in California and many people have been affected by either losing relatives in Japan or their jobs. It won't be long until we all see dramatic changes in our life involving money, oil prices and jobs.


http://articles.sfgate.com/2011-03-14/business/28690659_1_travel-plans-tour-operators-and-travel-tokyo-s-haneda

11 comments:

Smith said...

How do you foresee this impact the travel industry in Japan and worldwide? Do you foresee any governmental travel regulations (either Japanese or United States) coming out of this disaster?

Elianah Gorin said...

Japan is going to be struggling for a long time because of the tsnami, even if people are able to travel there the desire to travel to Japan will be decreased because so much was destoyed. If people are traveling for leisure they are going to want to go somewhere enjoyable, currently Japan is not exactly an enjoyable place to be. This will also have an affect on the global economy since Japan plays a major role in the global economy of goods and services. With the lack of money flowing in to Japan the global economic situation will momentarily contiue to deacrease.

hds2012 said...

I agree other parts of the world's economies, oil prices, and jobs will be affected because of this tsnami and earthquake. This is because Japan plays a vital and global role with goods, services, and specific factors of production. Other parts of the world will have to make up for the current shortages. Also, there is an impact on the travel agency because there are dangers in Japan currently. I expect that Japan's travel agencies could use the money from tourists at this time too but that option is not available. Japan will gradually rebuild, along with the economy, and also along with the travel agency in Japan.
-Hallie

taylor said...

Japan does play a vital and global role in the United States. This should be a time where we focus on our self and try to progress with our resources and find that we do have the things we need. This would greatly improve our economy by keeping the money to ourselves for our own resources. This might initially decrease the debt we have within the economy.

Garrett T. said...

Seeing as Japan is an island, let's be happy it wasn't wiped off the map completely. Japan's role in world was mostly being the most advanced in technology, besides foreign labor and what not. The tsunami will obviously hurt the economy as a whole, but in one aspect hopefully people will give some money in aid to Japan.

Alison said...

There are definitely going to be more people hurt by this than just the Japanese. So many businesses are based out of Japan and they provide a lot of factors of labor for the rest of the world. Someone else will likely take the lead, and that will boost that country's economy.

Meghan Mitchell said...

There is no doubt about how much this will impact everyone but Japan, as of right now, is obviously being impacted the most from this tragedy. People should respect the fact that they need time to get back on their feet and traveling there right now shouldn't be a concern. Unless Americans are going over there to help, I believe we should just let Japan heal and then be concerned with people who have "travel plans". Its true that we are going to see dramatic changes in oil prices, jobs, money and the economy in general but this is something everyone in the world must deal with and we will figure it out and eventually pull through.

Garrett T. said...

With some research into this, mostly as of right now there is only emotional impact world wide. As far as economic impact, worldwide GDP won't be as affected due to the fact that the influence of growth on worldwide GDP is around 7% so there really won't be a negative impact worldwide besides emotionally. It's also too early to tell how the events in Japan will affect North America.

Haley! said...

The impact of the Japan tsunami is more than definitely a large one. Their society has suffered tremendously and will continue to suffer until the country has a massive cleanup and rebuilds itself. This action will possible strengthen their recent downfall of their society. Like you said Taylor, this tsunami has affected the travel market for Japan as well. It is not safe for Americans, let alone anyone else, to travel there for vacation purposes. But, once their country gets back on their feet, the economy will be able to once again succeed with more and more travelers. Japan is going through hard times, the massive shortages of food and shelter, the loss of family and friends, along with many other issues, but once everything is back to normal, with new jobs and opportunities offered, the country will thrive. Due to this unfortunate event, once Japan gets back on their feet, they have an opportunity to truly shine and make themselves a country even better than before.

Dallas Alderton said...

I agree with this blog because if there isn’t much food and barely any water why would we risk that to allow people to go to Japan. By the end of May seems like a reasonable time for people to start flying to and from Japan. It’s a good idea to wait a while to see what kind of after affects might happen and how the land would respond to this disaster and also to see if they could get more food and how it would it react to the new area. The businesses down in Japan are really suffering from this and it isn’t going well with this so that’s another reason why May is a good ending because it is only one month after the original deadline. But my question is, in the long run will this help Japan for waiting so long?

Eric Edwards said...

This "no travel" time period is hurting Japan's economy very greatly. The more time there is with less money being circulated in the economy, the worse their economy will get. Soon, people will need to start going back to Japan for usual business trips and leisure. Once this starts happening, the economy will start to get better, but very slowly. It will interesting to see how fast their economy recovers.